Technology | How It Is Changing Education

 

Knoll_CaseStudey_01

As technology has transformed higher education, so has how we accommodate those changes. Technology makes learning mobile and makes students active participants in their education, engaging and collaborating with one another, in both small and large groups, in and out of the classroom. Their tools are at their fingertips. Now the classroom is portable. As a result high education is addressing these needs.                

 

Knoll Office facilitated the University of Portland Oregon’s project of modernizing its Clark Library. “We needed to create a fresh environment that would attract 19-23-year-olds to the library,” said Dan Danielson of Soderstrom Architects, of Portland.             

 

“Serving the digital natives of Generation Y on college campuses requires not only state-of-the-art technology, but also an environment that supports the highly collaborative way students work and learn today. At the University of Portland, administrators and library staff sought to create such a space to replace an existing mid-century library that no longer serviced today’s students,” cited Knoll’s case study.

 

Technology is at the forefront of the evolving needs of education, inspiring a mobile and dynamic learning environment that embraces creativity and collaboration. To bring Clark Library up to date, Knoll focused not only on technology, but also on creating collaborative spaces.

“We knew technology would be the heart of the library,” said Harrington. Moreover, improved connectivity was the driver planners assumed would build traffic.

 

Although the building’s technology infrastructure had been updated through the years, the furniture had not necessarily kept up, explained Erika Dehle, Interior Designer at Soderstrom Architects. A shortage of power outlets resulted in a dangerous and unsightly collection of endless cords across floors.”

 

They had cables, cords, tracks, Velcro,” Dehle said. Hampered by low ceilings that made burying cables in raised floors impossible, planners needed to find another solution. 

 

Equal to technology requirements was an acute need for spaces where students could learn collaboratively in a way that did not exist when the original library was built. “Collaboration was really central to what we wanted to do,” said Harrington.

 

From a cultural perspective, planners sought to enhance the facilities to encourage non-academic usage. “They wanted students to use it as a place where they would feel comfortable meeting, studying or whatever,” explained Gina Zaharie, Knoll Sales Representative. “While the physical piece was important, they really wanted that attraction piece to create a place to hang out.”

How technology is changing education_02
Knoll Case Study 02

“Clark Library went from an old traditional library with limited technical capability to a modern facility providing dynamic, interchangeable power, data, storage capacity and display capabilities,” summarized Corrado.

 

“My favorite part is going into the library and seeing it being used the way it is: a warm, inviting space,” said University Operations VP Ravelli. “It’s really night and day with our old space. The space has moved from a 1960s version of a library with mostly books and not much study space, full of dark wood and low energy to one that is high energy, vibrant with almost a “buzz” when you walk in there. Students no longer have to go to the library. They want to go because it’s the place to be. We’re pretty thrilled.”

 

 

 

Case Study information provided by Knoll.

 

 

7 Ways to Create a Healthy Office Space

HEALTHY OFFICE 7 ways

The healthy office is a well-balanced and positive environment where the relationship between space and employees is harmoniously integrated. Business Interiors can assist you in creating and maintaining a healthy work environment that can boost productivity and increase efficiency. We have put together some ideas that may help you create a healthy office space.
Let’s take a look:

 

⊗ CHOOSE GREEN MATERIALS

Green-Building-Labels-CS

Minimize indoor pollution by choosing materials that are green certified and minimize the emission of pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOC). Learn More

 

BRING NATURE INDOORS

plants-for-productivity

Incorporate plants that naturally remove harmful pollutants. Try for example Bamboo Palm, Snake Plant, Areca Palm, Spider Plant, Peace Lily, Gerbera Daisy and Phalaenopsis Orchids.
Another great option is to add a living wall to your space. Learn More

AP+I Design

 

LIGHTING

horizon_gallary4

Choose the right lighting solution to help with concentration and motivation. Learn More

 

PROVIDE WELL-EQUIPED BREAK AREAS

xl_BINGO_23B_KLKOHQ08

Provide an office break-room area/ cafeteria that encourages employees to eat healthy throughout the day. Learn More

 

MAKE AVAILABLE ERGONOMIC FURNITURE

WalkStation
Purchase ergonomic furniture such as treadmill desk, sit to stand desks and ergonomic task seating. Learn More

 

RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE

 

Reclaim_cover
Integrate recycling bins in key areas in the office to encourage and foster a green environment. Learn More

 

OPTIMIZE YOUR OFFICE LAYOUT

nof_fringe_74_enlarge

 

Optimize your office layout by understanding your employees’ needs and providing them with different office zones to accommodate different tasks such as quiet areas, activity spaces and team meeting rooms. Learn More

 

8753452

A High-Tech Partnership

Maximum Connectivity

Business Interiors’ new office/showroom is in a historic downtown former garage. (From left: Business Interiors President Alan Pizzitola and Joe Corona of Corona Integrated Systems.)

 A HIGH-TECH PARTNERSHIP

dirtt1
Dirtt@

Connectivity has become a key communication component in the workplace. When we moved to our new location, we knew that connecting rooms and staff was imperative for a successful and seamless collaboration environment. So, the process of finding the right company to assist us in achieving our goals started. Needless to say, a daunting task. Luckily for us we found Corona Integrated Systems. They listened, they asked the right questions, and most importantly they were able to adjust to all the different challenges we threw at them.

 

The Project:

7 Conference Rooms

1 Large Training Room 

3 Executive Offices

 

The Products:

+ AV System: Kramer VIA Connect PRO wireless presentation and collaboration system for each of the seven conference rooms.

 

DIRTT Solutions: designed and manufactured the entire wall environments, with power and other cabling inside, as well as provisions for the built-in AV systems.

 

The End Results:

A super high-tech environment with displays supported by custom mounts inside a glass wall.  The glass is painted from within the wall with an automotive-grade paint that makes it look like the image is part of the wall. Plus, the glass surface allows meeting participants to write on it, giving collaboration an additional dimension.

DIRTT3
Sound and Comm

Business Interiors and Corona Integrated Systems were featured in the recent August Issue of Sound & Communications

 

Magazine. www.soundandcommunications.com for the entire article.

_

 

All about the bar stool | Choosing the right height

Sometimes selecting the right height can prove to be a difficult tasks and we end up buying the wrong height bar stool. But do not despair, here is an easy visual guide to help you make the right buying choice:

counter-height-bar-stool-diamgram-infographic1

A counter-height bar stool is commonly 23-28 inches from the floor to the seat (23- to 28-inch seat height). Pair counter-height bars tools with 35 to 37-inch table heights.

bar-height-bar-stool-diamgram-infographic1

A bar-height bar stool is commonly 29-32 inches from the floor to the seat (29 to 32-inch seat height). Pair bar-height bar stools with 41 to 43-inch table heights.

extra-tall-bar-stools-diagram-guide

An extra-tall bar stool, also known as spectator height, is commonly 33-36 inches from the floor to the seat (33 to 36-inch seat height). Pair extra-tall bar stools with 44 to 47-inch table heights.

 

Here are some of our favorites:

Trends | Activity Spaces

TRENDS
Activity Spaces
A variety of spaces for a variety of work

ActivitySpacesMap

Knoll describes Activity Spaces as “go-to spaces accessible to everyone for everything from focused individual work through large community gatherings. Activity spaces vary in scale, formality, enclosure and flexibility. Invariably, they require proximity, privacy, and support for collaborative technology. And while they may share components and aesthetics with primary workspaces, they may also offer a deliberate contrast as an alternative”.

 

Let’s look at some cool ideas:

enclave-aa enclave-dividends-media-regeneration enclave-power-cube-diamond-suzanne-maya-lin  enclave-toboggan-scribe

To learn more click here

 

20 Of The Most Iconic Office Chairs of All Time

Among the many thousands of office chairs designed and manufactured today, there are a but a mere handful considered true icons of the industry. These chairs are not only the possible basis and inspiration for most created today, their timeless designs have kept them in production for up to more than 75 years.

 

We’ve highlighted our top 20 icons since 1925, below. Which ones would you add?


1) WASSILY LOUNGE CHAIR – 1925

 

 

Designer: Marcel Breuer

Manufacturer: Knoll

Marcel Breuer was an apprentice at the Bauhaus when he conceived the first tubular steel chair, the Wassily chair, based on the tubed frame of a bicycle.

 

 

 

2) LE CORBUSIER LC2 ARMCHAIR – 1928

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer : Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, Charlotte Perriand

Manufacturer: Cassina

The “Cassina I Maestri” (Cassina Masters) collection includes some of the most important furniture created by leading figures in the Modern Movement, pieces which have since become landmarks in the evolution of contemporary design.

 

 

 

3) BARCELONA CHAIR – 1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Manufacturer: Knoll

The Barcelona chair features the pure compositional structure that now epitomizes Modern architecture.

 

 

 

4) FLAT BAR BRNO CHAIR – 1929

Designer: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Manufacturer: Knoll

Designed for the Tugendhat house in Brno, Czechoslovakia, the Brno chair mirrors the ground breaking simplicity of its original environment. The simple profile, clean lines and meticulous attention to detail have elevated the Brno chair to an icon of twentieth century furniture design.

 

 

 

5) RISOM LOUNGE CHAIR – 1941

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Jens Risom

Manufacturer: Knoll

 

One of the first designers to bring traditional Scandinavian values to the United States with the Risom Lounge chair, Jens Risom was part of a new vanguard that helped establish post-war America’s leadership role in modern furniture design and manufacturing.

 

 

 

6) EAMES MOLDED PLYWOOD CHAIR – 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Charles and Ray Eames

Manufacturer: Herman Miller

Designed to comfortably fit the body, the sculpted form of the molded plywood chairs are produced using thin sheets of lightweight veneer gently molded into curved shapes with natural rubber shock mounts to absorb movement.

 

 

 

7) WOMB CHAIR – 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Eero Saarinen

Manufacturer: Knoll

The Womb Chair displays the Finnish-born designer’s flair for challenging rules, breaking molds and setting new standards for modern design.

 

 

 

8) EIFFEL CHAIR – 1946

Designer: Charles and Ray Eames

Manufacturer: Herman Miller

In the 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames were looking forward while other American designers were content to stay put. Designed in 1948, the Eiffel Chair was the first plastic chair to be mass-produced with its clean, simple form that is sculpted to fit the body.

 

 

 

9) DIAMOND CHAIR – 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Harry Bertoia

Manufacturer: Knoll

Innovative, comfortable and strikingly handsome, the chair’s delicate appearance belies its strength and durability. In Bertoia’s own words, “If you look at these chairs, they are mainly made of air, like sculpture. Space passes right through them.”

 

 

 

10) FLORENCE KNOLL ARM CHAIR – 1954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Florence Knoll

Manufacturer: Knoll

Like so many of her groundbreaking designs that became the gold standard for the industry, Florence Knoll’s 1954 lounge collection has made its way into the pantheon of modern classics.

 

 

 

11) BUTTERFLY STOOL – 1954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Sori Yanagi

Manufacturer: Vitra

“True beauty is not made ; it is born naturally”, Sori Yanagi, hence the Butterfly Stool.

 

 

 

12) STACKABLE CHAIR SERIES 7 – 1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Arne Jacobsen

Manufacturer: The Republic of Fritz Hansen

In speaking of the Stackable Chair Series 7, Arne Jac”I have made my chairs so that they can be stacked and leave the floor open.” -Arne Jacobsen

 

 

 

13) TULIP CHAIR – 1956

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Eero Saarinen

Manufacturer: Knoll

In his purist approach to architecture and interior design, Finnish-born Eero Saarinen sought the essential idea and reduced it to the most effective structural solution within an overall unity of design.

 

 

 

14) LOUNGE CHAIR AND OTTOMAN – 1956

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Charles and Ray Eames

Manufacturer: Herman Miller

Originally designed as a gift for their friend Billy Wilder, the director of “Some Like It Hot” and “Sunset Blvd,” the Eames’ lounge chair and ottoman is recognized everywhere including museums like MOMA in New York and the Art Institute of Chicago. They have even been the subject of documentaries and books.

 

 

 

15) EGG CHAIR – 1958

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Arne Jacobsen

Manufacturer: The Republic of Fritz Hansen

Originally designed for the lobby and reception areas of the Royal Hotel in Copenhagen, this organically egg shaped chair has since become synonymous with Danish furniture design throughout the world.

 

 

 

16) SWAN CHAIR – 1958

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Arne Jacobsen

Manufacturer: The Republic of Fritz Hansen

In 1958, the Swan was a technologically innovative chair: No straight lines – only curves.

 

 

 

17) ALUMINUM CHAIR GROUP – 1958

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Charles and Ray Eames

Manufacturer: Vitra

The Aluminium Chair, one of the greatest furniture designs of the 20th century, stands out for its intelligent combination of materials. The covers are attached inside the aluminium profile sections and simply stretched over the frame, transforming them from mere coverings to a load-bearing part of the structure.

 

 

 

18) PANTON CHAIR – 1960

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Verner Panton

Manufacturer: Vitra

Most people spend their lives living in dreary, beige conformity, mortally afraid of using color. The main purpose of my work is to provoke people into using their imagination and make their surroundings more exciting.” – Verner Panton

 

 

 

19) BALL CHAIR – 1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Eero Aarnio

Manufacturer: Adelta

A Ball Chair is a “room within a room” with a cozy and calm atmosphere, protecting outside noises and giving a private space for relaxing or having a phone call. Turning around its own axis on the base the view to the outer space is variable for the user and thus he is not completely excluded from world outside.

 

 

 

20) SOFT PAD CHAIR – 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designer: Charles and Ray Eames

Manufacturer: Vitra

The Soft Pad is identical to the Aluminium Chair, although the attached padded sections form an interesting contrast to the elegant aluminium frame. They make the Soft Pad Chair softer and plusher, without detracting from its transparency and clear lines.


7 iPad Apps for Architects and General Contractors: National Architect Week, Day 5

AutoCad WS

 

During National Architect Week, we wanted to take a look at how digital technology is helping the industry go paperless. Although still in its infancy, tablets and compatible applications for the day-to-day work of architects and contractors, are growing.

Ryan Sutton-Gee, CEO of PlanGrid, noted in this TechCrunch article that the tablet is basically the first computer that is truly usable in the field. As a result apps are already starting to be rapidly adopted allowing construction companies to:

  • Say goodbye to blueprints
  • Improve analytics to manage team efficiency in the field
  • Improve communication between the construction team and architect

 

Below are 7 iPad apps useful for both architects and general contractors interested in transitioning to a paperless workflow.

  • AutoCAD© WS – View and edit DWG files wherever you are on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Android smartphone or tablet with a powerful set of mobile design tools.
  • Bentley Navigator for the iPad – Gives a 360-degree view of 3-D design models. Using iPad’s motion sensors and touch screens, you will not only get panoramic views but also get object properties. For example, you can determine the thickness of the pipe, or its paint color, or the pressure rating.
  • PlanGrid – Store, view, manage and share your blueprints on the iPad.
  • Procore for iPhone and iPad – Includes a punch list tool, photos and daily log.
  • TOTAL for iPad (formerly DaVinci) – The first field app for appraisers on the iPad. Filling out onsite inspection forms is done with a few taps of your finger, and every data gathering screen is completely customizable to fit individual workflow.
  • Construction Punchlist for iPad – Stores plans on the iPad, annotates plans with the touch of a finger, and automatically generates site visit reports and emails reports on the fly.
  • OnSite PlanRoom for iPad – Review and share plans and construction documents, all from the convenience of your iPad.

 

    Do you have any favorite apps that help you do your job as an architect or contractor? 

    DESIGN CONNECTS – Don’t forget to visit the AIA website for more information about how you can participate in National Architecture Week .

7 Video Interviews with Famous Architects: National Architecture Week, Day 4

Architecture is one of those creative industries where the work not only speaks for itself, it is long-standing and long-lasting – making it imperative that the architect connect his/her designs capably with the environment as well as for the people it is designed. For National Architecture Week we have chosen a few architects we believe more than accomplish this these challenges. If you too are inspired by the works of these fascinating talents, you are sure to enjoy the up-close and personal interviews below.

Frank Lloyd Wright

In this documentary, Wright talks about life, culture, and organic architecture (1962)

“I’ve been accused of saying “I” was the greatest architect in the world and if I had said so, I don’t think it would be very arrogant because I don’t believe there are many, if any. For 500 years what we call architecture has been phony in the sense that it was not innate it was not organic. It didn’t have the character of nature. A building should be natural appropriate to the the time. Appropriate to the place.” – Frank Lloyd Wright


 

I.M. Pei

At 92, Chinese-American I. M. Pei, was named The 2010 Royal Gold Medallist. This 10 minute film is an edited version of the 35 minute film shown in lieu of a traditional lecture at his request. It features a personal interview and examples of his work over five decades.

“I have always been fascinated by the West.” – I. M. Pei


 

Le Corbusier

Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known as Le Corbusier, was famous for being one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture. A student of modern high design he was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities.

 

Zaha Hadid

The first woman to win the Pritzker Prize for Architecture in its 26 year history, Zaha Hadid defined a radically new approach to architecture by creating buildings with multiple perspective points and fragmented geometry to evoke the chaos of modern life.

In this interview with Maison & Objet in 2008 after being named the erhielt sie den Titel “Designer of The Year,” Hadid discusses the concept of a creating a fluid world in the sense that there is no boundary for people to move from space to another.

 

Renzo Piano

Piano, an Italian Pritzker Prize-winning architect describes the building site as a magical place where the art of construction takes place and reminds us that building architecture lasts a long time.

An architect is always connected to the past and he is always connected to the future. You need the past because you need the memory, but you need invention as well. I’m very grateful for tradition, but at the same time, I hate tradition. –Renzo Piano


 

Frank Gehry

A living legend, Frank Gehry has forged his own language of architecture, creating astonishing buildings all over the world, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, and Manhattan’s new IAC building.

For me, every day is a new thing. I approach each project with a new insecurity, almost like the first project I ever did, and I get the sweats, I go in and start working, I’m not sure where I’m going.” – Frank Gehry

Jacques Herzog

Interviewed by The New York Times Jacques Herzog of Herzog and de Meuron discusses the concept of instincts within architecture and ponders whether repetition is considered evil.

Work that strikes me makes me aware of the place or the landscape and then it makes me aware of myself. – Jaques Herzog

Click here to see view Herzog’s interview.
 
These are just a few of our favorites. You can find more interesting interviews with architects here. Who are your favorite architects?

DESIGN CONNECTS – Don’t forget to visit the AIA website for more information about how you can participate in National Architecture Week .

 

5 Tips to Prepare Your Office Furniture Budget

5 Tips to Prepare Your Office Furniture BudgetWhen purchasing office furniture, you need to be prepared to answer the following question.

“What is your budget?”

If you don’t have a budget, don’t feel alone. Most companies are unfamiliar with costs associated with office furniture, and often find themselves dependent upon contract furniture dealers, architects and designers to determine how much they need to spend. But there are some things you can do to on your end that will help them, help you. It will also give you the upper hand at the negotiation stage.

Below are 5 quick tips to help you get started building an office furniture budget:

  • Decide how many people you need to provide workspaces and/or seating.
  • Decide whether lighting or other furnishings fit into your budget.
  • Determine how many spaces you need to fill with furniture, and assign a value to each.
  • Add 5% for shipping, 10% for installation, and 10% for tax.
  • Add 20% to the total to give yourself a buffer against miscellaneous expenses.

 

Budgets based on solid information with a bit of a cushion will reduce heartache and hysteria down the road. If you are convinced you need to spend it all, there are no surprises. If you come in under budget, all the better.

Either way, a realistic budget upfront saves money in the long run.

Pantone’s 2013 Color of the Year Can Make Your Office Shine

Last year’s color of the year, Tangerine Tango, was a spirited, reddish orange that provided the energy boost we needed to recharge and move forward.

 

The 2013 PANTONE Color of the Year, Emerald 17-5641, picks up where the tango left off with a vivid, verdant green, enhancing our sense of well-being even further by inspiring insight, as well as promoting balance and harmony.

 

Emerald is sophisticated and luxurious.
Since antiquity, this luminous, magnificent hue has been the color of beauty and new life in many cultures and religions. It’s also the color of growth, renewal and prosperity – no other color conveys regeneration more than green. For centuries, many countries have chosen green to represent healing and unity.

 

“Green is the most abundant hue in nature – the human eye sees more green than any other color in the spectrum,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®. “As it has throughout history, multifaceted Emerald continues to sparkle and fascinate. Symbolically, Emerald brings a sense of clarity, renewal and rejuvenation, which is so important in today’s complex world. This powerful and universally appealing tone translates easily to both fashion and home interiors.”

 

A Little History About the PANTONE Color of the Year

The Color of the Year selection is a very thoughtful process. To arrive at the selection, Pantone quite literally combs the world looking for color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films that are in production, traveling art collections, hot new artists, popular travel destinations and other socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from technology, availability of new textures and effects that impact color, and even upcoming sports events that capture worldwide attention.

 

For more than a decade, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home and industrial design, as well as product packaging and graphic design. Below are just a few of the past colors.

 

Pantone color of the year swatches

How do you use PANTONE’s expertise when designing offices? Will you use Emerald? We’d love to see how!